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     @DerSPIEGEL  
    America First! Earth Last! #ParisAgreement

    As a crowd of a thousand or so protested outside the White House,  Trump bots took to Twitter en force this afternoon,  spewing their disinformation and venom in rapid response to the decision to withdraw from the Paris Accord.

     THIS IS INSANITY!

    Feisty ☀️Floridian @peddoc63  2m2 minutes ago 
    Look how quickly they organized protest front of White House. Nothing but paid Soros Puppets. #Shame#ParisAgreement

    Riya sharma @riyasharma266  3m3 minutes ago 
    Keep our money here in America & rebuild our infrastructure. Take care of our veterans and their families. #AmericaFirst

    #ParisAgreement

    I'd rather our time on planet Earth be shorter and free than longer under an oppressive world government. #parisagreement

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    REALLY? REALLY? REALLY? 
    Jacob edwards @Jacobedwards19  5m5 minutes ago 
    Today's Democrats, Liberals and Climate people are like ISIS. Believe what we say and believe or we'll kill you #ParisAgreement

     

    #ParisAgreement Watch how fast the Europeans abandon their phony positions now that the USA won't pay for them. We are no longer patsies.


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    Naturally, the game has attracted a good number of deniers and bots… Titled: We will We will Scam you 

    HuffPost Comedy

    #ClimateChangeMusic is Twitter's way of tuning out the deniers http://huffp.st/8sduok7 
     

    Check out the feed for attributions for some of my favorites

    • All we are saying is give bees a chance
    • There's a Denier who's sure All that glitters is gold And he's buying a stairway to climate change hell
    • Killing me softly with his smog  
    •  What's coal got to do with it?
    • I  Can't See Clearly Now
    • We will We will Scam you
    • All I Need is Some Air I Can Breathe
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      I Can’t See Clearly Now

    • I Wanna Rain Dance with Somebody
    • Hail to the Thief
    • Becky with the Good Air
    • A Hard Toxic Rain's A-Gonna Fall
    • Blinded by the Light and Irrefutable Scientific Evidence.
    • We don't need no deforestation.
    • Give him the heat boys, he has no soul Buy him a seat on a big ice floe and drift away
    • When the world seems to take a dump like you've had to much Trump That's amore.
    • Somewhere over emissions Way up high And the life that existed Extinct by our own design


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    I met Alice this morning. She was walking along the path to the Mill Valley Dog Park with her small fluffy ball of a pet as Aggie Pocket and I were heading out to the field to do a few runs through the agility course.

    It was a warm morning and she was dressed in jeans and a bright flowered shirt. An older woman.  There was just something about her that cried loneliness to a part of me which is often lonely.

    And so I ended up spending about 20 minutes with her, as she sat on the bench in the shade. It turns out just last week she moved from her home of 45 years just one town up the freeway into an assisted living facility.  The facility is about a half mile walk from the dog park. She was winded by the time she arrived. But happy that she had found a place so close to where she now lives to walk to.

    I decided Aggie and I would forego agility today and spend some quality time with Alice.

    She talked about packing up 45 years of her life. Her past pets. Her children, all of whom live in towns nearby.  She said the house she bought for $25k is now work over $1 million, but she’s hoping she’ll be able to rent it to cover the monthly costs at the assisted living community.

    I shared stories of some of the changes I’ve made in my life over the years; the moves, the downsizing , the losses of pets. The things I wish now I had held onto.  

    “This must be a difficult time for you,” I said, deciding to make the leap and state the obvious.

    “It is so hard when you’re used to living alone to have so many people around, to go down to breakfast and have all these people talking and laughing,” she said.  “I’ve met a few people who might be friends in the future.”

    She looked out over the grass field. “I have a month to change my mind.  My kids and the people who work there keep reminding me that I don’t have to stay if it’s not going to work. I can move home. It’s not too late.”

    She asked if I came to the park regularly and I said, oddly enough, no. That this was only my second time visiting after a year.  

    When I left, Alice had a big smile on her face.  We exchanged names and hopes that we would run into each other again.

    “Chin up,” I called over my shoulder.

    “Chin up,” she replied, with a huge, huge nod and a wide, wide grin.

    Ah, look at all the lonely people.

    Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who wish to share part of the evening around a virtual kitchen table with readers of Daily Kos who aren’t throwing pies at one another. Drop by and tell us about your weather, your garden, or what you cooked for supper. Newcomers may notice that many who post diaries and comments in this series already know one another to some degree, but we welcome guests at our kitchen table, and hope to make some new friends as well.


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    Nope, this isn’t me …. 

    The theme  ‘rituals’ passed through my mind last night as I worked through two canisters full of H2O water picking my teeth.  It had come up in yoga a few times this week, it being Summer Solstice and all. How important they are. How nurturing and centering they can be.  How we could benefit from creating new rituals in our lives.

    Could thinking of water picking as a ritual elevate it to a more revered place in my daily routine, I wondered?

     What remains in my life that constitutes a ritual? My yoga practice. My daily evening iRest ritual. Morning walks with my dog along the Sausalito waterfront. 6-8pm Pacific with Rachel and Laurence. Hell, I suppose showing up to host KTK on Thursday evenings might be considered a ritual. 

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    “In essence a ritual is about bringing sacredness into your life, and about honouring something greater than you and I. It is about honouring the mystery, and the bringer of life in all things, from the flowers, to the trees, to the birds, the tiny caterpillar glistening on a fresh leaf, or the waking sun, and the moonlight. There is a divine force that moves through all things, like a river, enlivening all of life. It is the same force that moves the plant to flower, the wolf to howl, or lights up a baby’s face. As we become more aware of this higher force moving in our lives and express our gratitude for it, it expands and colours daily life with a radiance and light that connects us to all living things.Link

    Rituals are powerful because they can give us a sense of having some control in a world which is increasingly chaotic. They can serve as touchstones to keep us connected with structure and energy outside ourselves. They can remind us that we are not alone.

    Rituals like: Space clearing, Gratitude, Blessing your food, Prayer, or Chanting can greatly enhance your life. Being in nature is one of the most blessed resources we have. I love to sit in nature and reflect. To listen, to be with myself, on the ground, at one with all of life. Watching the wind move through the leaves, or the first rays of light shoot forth into the sky, sitting under the stars, walking in the local national parks, or being beside a river in the rain forest, is deeply restorative. Nature helps us reset. By bringing in regular mindful times in nature you can truly transform your life. Just sitting, being and listening in nature can bring forth insights, understanding and answers. Problems are solved and life resets itself, the pieces naturally falling into place.

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    We are said to have about 25,000 mornings as an adult. How will you start your day? 

    In a Scientific American article Why Rituals Work, Francesca Gino and Michael I. Norton note that even though there may not be a  “causal connection between a ritual and a desired outcome, “performing rituals with the intention of producing a certain result appears to be sufficient for that result to come true. While some rituals are unlikely to be effective – knocking on wood will not bring rain – many everyday rituals make a lot of sense and are surprisingly effective.”

    Beginning a New Ritual

    • Start small
    • Make it a daily commitment.
    • Do something you enjoy.
    • Be kind to yourself if you forget or don’t do your ritual.

    Which basically is telling me that if I do ritualize my water picking, it’s fine if I conveniently skip a night or two.

    Assignment: Have any rituals you’d like to share?  The floor is open.

    Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who wish to share part of the evening around a virtual kitchen table with readers of Daily Kos who aren’t throwing pies at one another. Drop by and tell us about your weather, your garden, or what you cooked for supper. Newcomers may notice that many who post diaries and comments in this series already know one another to some degree, but we welcome guests at our kitchen table, and hope to make some new friends as well.


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    The power of Twitter is what it releases into the public sphere: the prehistoric reptile brain chained up by a thousand generations of human social organization. Now, much of this history has involved fierce repression—often cruel, sometimes stupid, and always changing. But as society progresses and the parameters change, what doesn’t change is the root idea that we need to control ourselves in order to coexist. We need a grown-up standing between the sudden thought and the spoken word. We need an armed grown-up between the impulse and the deed. That’s what Twitter tosses out the window: the very value of self-control. From Donald Trump: The President of Id

    Imagine  @RealDickCheney tweeting Trump’s currently infamous (but undoubtedly soon to be forgotten) message  to 32.9M followers:

     

    I heard poorly rated @Morning_Joe speaks badly of me (don't watch anymore). Then how come low I.Q. Crazy Mika, along with Psycho Joe, came..

    ...to Mar-a-Lago 3 nights in a row around New Year's Eve, and insisted on joining me. She was bleeding badly from a face-lift. I said no!

    Something about this morning’s tweet brought to mind the time Newt lost his list of words (it was found in a Washington, DC park, as I recall), and got me thinking researching the words and phrases Trump uses most often.


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    A report released yesterday by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication reveals that just 13 percent of Americans are aware of the fact that over 90% of climate scientists concur that human-caused climate change is happening. 

    This news as EPA head Scott Pruit last week announced plans to convene a panel to delve into the science behind the concept of human’s causing climate change.  

    In an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal in April, Steven Koonin, a physicist at New York University, proposed that a “red team” of dissenting scientists be established to critique major scientific reports on climate change. A “blue team” of climate scientists would then rebut the criticisms, and the resulting back-and-forth would unfold in public view.

    As the US plans for a  “red team-blue team” exercise to challenge mainstream climate science, at Germany’s G20 Angele Merkel’s hopes to present a united front against the US retreat from the Paris Accord are threatened with rumors that Saudi Arabia, Russia, Turkey, and Indonesia are wavering in their commitment. 

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    “Huge efforts are underway now to make sure as many countries as possible hold the line and compensate for America’s withdrawal by redoubling their efforts. How far this goes, I have my doubts,” said Dennis Snower, president of the Kiel Institute for the World Economy, a leading German think tank advising the European Commission ahead of the summit meeting.

    “It doesn’t look good,” Mr. Snower said. “It does not look like we are going to have 19 countries and the United States against.”

    Hold onto your hats, folks. While all eyes are on the Trump/Putin meeting tomorrow, a hell of a lot is also riding on Merkel’s mettle.

    Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who wish to share part of the evening around a virtual kitchen table with readers of Daily Kos who aren’t throwing pies at one another. Drop by and tell us about your weather, your garden, or what you cooked for supper. Newcomers may notice that many who post diaries and comments in this series already know one another to some degree, but we welcome guests at our kitchen table, and hope to make some new friends as well.

    Note: Unexpected plans tonight, so I’ll be in absentia for awhile. Sorry about that.


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    There’s a great interactive in today's NYT If You Fix This, You Fix a Big Piece of the Climate Puzzle, which asks readers to chose which of four potential actions represents the most effective solution for climate change.

     What do you think it is?

    • Build More Wind Farms
    • Eat Less Meat Worldwide
    • Improve Air Conditioners
    • Switch to mass transit

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    And the answer is …

    Improve Air conditioners!   Due in great part to the projection that by 2050,  businesses and homeowners in Asia and Africa are expected to buy some 1.6 billion air conditioners.  

    New research from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California indicates that adding improved efficiency in refrigeration and phasing out fluorinated gases used for cooling, as mandated by international agreement, could eliminate a full degree Celsius of warming by 2100.

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    The success of this endeavor hinges to a great extent on the ability to ratify the Kigali amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which outlawed the use of CFCs coolants. The HFCs which were approved as a substitute doesn't deplete ozone but they do act as “warming agents.” The Kigali amendment would phase out HFCs by 2100,

    No surprise that the US State Department has not yet taken any action on the amendment. And, of course, our dear friend Senator James M. Inhofe says no way will he support the amendment should it reach Capitol Hill.

    All of which means that figuring out more efficient ways in which to cool ourselves is going to be a huge challenge over the next 30 years.

    So what can we do to beat the heat? 

    Tips for Staying Cool Without An Air Conditioner

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    1. Wear loose-fitting clothing, preferably of a light color.
    2. Cotton clothing will keep you cooler than many synthetics.
    3. Fill a spray bottle with water and keep it in the refrigerator for a quick refreshing spray to your face after being outdoors.
    4. Fans can help circulate air and make you feel cooler even in an air-conditioned house.

    Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who wish to share part of the evening around a virtual kitchen table with readers of Daily Kos who aren’t throwing pies at one another. Drop by and tell us about your weather, your garden, or what you cooked for supper. Newcomers may notice that many who post diaries and comments in this series already know one another to some degree, but we welcome guests at our kitchen table, and hope to make some new friends as well.


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    There is a story in Judith Lasiter’s book Living Your Yoga about a monk who comes along an abandoned well-weathered rowboat grounded along the shores of a lake. The monk invests time and love restoring the boat before taking it out on the lake. As they travel a thickening mist rises from the water and after a short time, another rowboat emerges from the mist and rams into him.  Furious over the accident, he peers into the other boat and upon observing that it is empty his anger dissipates.

    Lasiter suggests that the takeaway lesson from this story is that if we change our perspective and view annoying events and people in our lives as empty rowboats we also can free ourselves from negative emotions.

    She suggests using "The rowboat is empty" as a daily mantra to help us navigate our way through life.

    “So much of our suffering is linked to effort and to reactions that are tied to an ironclad perspective,” Lasiter suggests. “When the monk took a good look at what had happened, he moved from reacting to having perspective.”

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    Working from the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Lasiter posits that by clinging to a particular point of view, we are incapable of discerning what is actually truly in front of us. “Enlightenment, in fact, is nothing more and nothing less than a radical change of perspective.”

    Lasiter shares another story to offer suggestions about the power of changing perspective.

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    A farmer visits the village elder with complaints about how difficult his life is — his mother, six children, mother, cows, chicken, horses. He doesn’t have a moment to himself.  The elder tells him to buy a goat. The farmer is befuddled but takes the elders advice.  

    A few weeks later he returns. “Why did you tell me to buy a goat?” he asks. “My life is more complicated than ever!”

    “Sell the goat,” the elder says.

    The farmer sells the goat. Life on the farm suddenly seems peaceful.
    ”When you find yourself in a situation that could be made better if you were to step back to gain perspective, inhale gently and on your next exhalation, say to yourself “SELL THE GOAT!”

    Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who wish to share part of the evening around a virtual kitchen table with readers of Daily Kos who aren’t throwing pies at one another. Drop by and tell us about your weather, your garden, or what you cooked for supper. Newcomers may notice that many who post diaries and comments in this series already know one another to some degree, but we welcome guests at our kitchen table, and hope to make some new friends as well.


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